chasingthecrazies

Chasing my crazy dream in the writing world…

Query 101 Series: Research, Research and More Research April 11, 2014

Once your query is a masterpiece, you think you’re done, right? Wish I could say that’s so, but there’s more work ahead. Now it’s time to figure out who you want to receive that shining gem. But before you can do that, you must do your research.

 

First, I recommend you have a clear understanding of your category (i.e. is your book Middle Grade or Young Adult?)

Here’s a great post from Writer’s Digest on defining categories: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/questions-and-quandaries/writing-for-kids/defining-picture-books-middle-grade-and-young-adult

 

Next, make sure you’ve determined the correct genre for your work. This is critical to the querying process. Why? Because I’ve heard many agents say they’ve rejected a query because it was labeled wrong and they did not rep. said genre.

 

For help with determining genre, check out this link from literary agent, Jennifer Laughran: http://literaticat.blogspot.com/2010/10/big-ol-genre-glossary.html

 

Once you have your category and genre clear, you can move on to agent stalking, umm, I mean agent research. While finding someone who takes your category and genre is imperative, you should also research their sales, publishers they’ve sold to, and how long they’ve worked with their clients. In my opinion, when querying an agent, you need to look for someone who wants to invest in your entire career, because of course, you’re going to write more than one book!

 

So where do you go to research agents?

 

Here are two websites that will help your process: AgentQuery and QueryTracker. Both will allow you to research by category. From there, you can drill down to see which take your genre. Once you determine this information, I suggest you go to that agent’s website. Many times they may have changed their query guidelines, be closed to queries, or revamped their wish list. You can also check out writing communities like AbsoluteWrite & AgentQueryConnect for writer feedback on agents. Note: Research should also be done on publishers if you’re going to submit to them as well.

 

Once you’ve determined the right agents for your manuscript, I recommend one additional research step. Google that agent and see if they have a personal blog and/or if they’ve done any interviews. Often times these bits of information can give you additional insight into what the agent wants. It can also help you personalize your query letter to highlight how you and the agent would be a good match.

 

I know this may seem like a ton of work – IT IS. But doing the legwork prior to querying may save you a lot of heartbreak. Determining which agent is a good fit for you will help with needless querying & rejection. Hopefully, it will connect you with the right person who believes in your work and wants to partner with you to ensure you have a successful career!

 

Want additional insight into what agents want and reject in queries? I recommend checking out these hashtags on Twitter:

 

#TenqueriesIn10Tweets

#Tenqueries

#10queries

#InboxInsights

 

And you can always ask your general publishing questions during #askagent sessions.

 

As always, I wish you luck on your querying journey and please feel free to ask questions in the comments!

 

Up next in Query 101: The Personalization Quandary & Comps

 

 

 

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2 Responses to “Query 101 Series: Research, Research and More Research”

  1. Good post. One thing querying writers seem to forget, too, is that getting an agent is just one step in this process, it’s not much of an end in and of itself. And you shouldn’t be looking for “an” agent, you should be looking for the agent who’s going to be the best representative for you and your book and who you’ll work best with. Doing the legwork on the front end, like you’re discussing here, can also save some huge heartburn down the line.


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