chasingthecrazies

Chasing my crazy dream in the writing world…

Helping Out A Friend July 16, 2015

Filed under: Blog,Inspiration — chasingthecrazies @ 6:59 am
Tags: , ,

Bartles Auction

 

 

 

Popping in from my break to tell you all about a project that is close to my heart. A fellow writing friend, Brenda Drake is holding an online auction for another amazing writer, Veronica Bartles. Veronica and her family are trying to move back into their family home, but due to mold issues they cannot at this time.

 

 

To help out Veronica and her family, Brenda is hosting an online auction with some stellar items like agent critiques, author critiques, signed books and more. I’ve donated a query critique (number 68) in hopes of doing my small part for this important cause.

 

 

If you’re interested in checking out the auction, here is the link: http://www.brenda-drake.com/2015/07/auction-to-help-save-pitch-wars-mentor-veronica-bartles-home-with-critiques-signed-books-and-more/

 

 

For more on Veronica’s story go here: http://www.gofundme.com/we4dv4m

 

 

Whether you’re interested in bidding or not, I wanted to share this because it makes me realize, once again, how proud I am to be part of the writing community. When one of us falls down, there always seems to be dozens of sets of arms willing to lift us back up. That’s why day in and out I’m always proud to call myself a writer!

 

 

Have an amazing day and see you all again in August!

 

Hugs,

 

Amy

 

Monday Musings: Taking A Break June 8, 2015

Filed under: Blog,creative writing,Publishing — chasingthecrazies @ 1:00 pm
Tags: ,

Ferris Wheel

 

 

 

 

Most of my childhood memories from summer involve rollercoasters, log rides, or turns on the Ferris Wheel. The reason why is pretty simple. I grew up a fifteen minute drive from Disneyland. At night you could actually climb onto my roof and watch the fireworks in the distance. Living so close to Disneyland fed an obsession I had for rollercoasters and anything that would turn me upside down, spin me around, or basically twist in the air. I loved the feeling of free-falling when the log ride dropped me down that final chute, or the inability to walk a straight line after a speedy turn on Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride.

 

 

 

Funny how nowadays I feel like my life has turned into one long spin on the teacups. For the last year I’ve been in sort of a whirlwind. Trying to get a handle on being in the publishing world (querying, signing with an agent, working on two new books) has in a lot of ways made me feel like I’m on 100 mph ride that does not want to stop.

 

 

 

Don’t get me wrong, I feel absolutely blessed to be in the great position I’m in. Writing every day. Working on new ideas is a blessing I don’t take for granted for a second. But I must admit that in a lot of ways it has taken over my life in a way that’s not really healthy. Important things have fallen by the wayside. Events I should be paying more attention to have sort of slipped away. Honestly, my life feels really out of balance and it’s taken my focus away from important things that matter a great deal to me.

 

 

 

With this in mind, I’ve decided to take the next month and a half to restore my life back to normality. Part of this means focusing on the here and now. Being present in the moment. But that’s hard to do when you’re constantly worried about being active on social media or what you’re going to post on your blog for the next several weeks. So I’ve made the decision to go quiet for a while. Fall in love with a few good books. Take the time to reconnect with family and friends. But most important: take a breath and remind myself why I love to write.

 

 

 

I hope you’ll stop back in August when I return. There are lots of cool things in the works including many more successful queries to share, as well as an important BEHIND THE CURTAIN post you won’t want to miss.

 

 

 

My wish for you is a summer filled with precious memories. I hope you’ll drink some lemonade. Watch the sunset. Maybe get your feet wet in the sand. But most of all, I hope you’ll hug the ones closest to you. They are really what this life is all about.

 

 

Hugs,

 

Amy

 

 

 

BEHIND THE CURTAIN – Listening To Your Gut – A guest post from Christina Lee June 3, 2015

BTC logo

 

 

 

Even though we are in an age where information is readily at hand, it still seems many things in the publishing world are kept in the dark. Things that we’re taught not to talk about or share. One of these things is rejection and how long it takes to sell a book.

 

 

The authors who seem to get the most exposure are the ones who have whirlwind experiences. They write and sell their first book in a year and suddenly they’re on the New York Times Bestseller list. As most writers know, this is NOT the norm. But for those outside of publishing, that’s all they see. This exposure puts pressure on a lot of writers to sell the first book they’ve got out on sub. If they don’t, they walk away feeling like they’ve not only let themselves down but others who believed in them (agent, family, critique partners).

 

 

This leads me to a conversation I had with Christina Lee when I attended my first RT convention. One evening the organizers arranged a scavenger hunt through Bourbon Street. While I was in one location, a good writer friend, A.J. Pine introduced me to an author I really admired, Christina.  I actually had a hard time speaking after we met. I’d  just finished her book, ALL OF YOU and loved it.

 

 

As we talked, Christina opened up to me about the ups and downs she went through in publishing before she sold her first book. That conversation was over a year ago and to this day I still think about it vividly.

 

 

Her story makes for the perfect “Behind The Curtain” post because many times writers don’t talk about what happened prior to selling their first book. Rejections, unsold books, and failed agent relationships are forced back into the shadows like pieces of dirty laundry everyone is too afraid to talk about. To be honest, by keeping quiet I think we’re doing the writing community a disservice.

 

 

If you want to write, then I think you should go into the publishing world with your eyes wide open. You need to be aware that there’s not some magical formula you can create to sell a book. It takes years of hard work, sacrifice, and perseverance for many writers before it happens.

 

 

So today I’m proud to share this guest post from Christina Lee. I hope it will touch you and open your eyes to the realities of publishing. We each have our own path and it takes bravery and guts to follow wherever it may lead!

 

 

 

 

BEHIND THE CURTAIN

Guest Post From Christina Lee

 

 

 

Thanks for inviting me to write something for your Behind The Curtain series. To tell you a little bit about my journey, I wrote my first book in 2008. It was like a hybrid NA/YA romance that will thankfully never see the light of day. HA!

 

 

 

But finishing that first book was so liberating because I gave it my all and figured out my passion for writing fiction in the process. Plus, I began learning my craft. You can only do that with lots of practice, rewrites, revisions and critiques from other writers.

 

 

 

In hindsight, that wreck of a book still wasn’t ready and no surprise that it was never picked up by an agent. So I began writing another young adult novel immediately. That one got some attention from a few agents but ultimately I had to shelf that book as well.

 

 

 

I landed my first agent with my third YA book. We went on submission, but then something strange happened. She left the business suddenly with no forewarning to her clients. There were other disappointments that went along with that situation (that I won’t mention publicly) but honestly, I should’ve known better. Because in the end, I never listened to my gut when I signed with her. I was so excited about being repped—she seemed cool, legit, loved my book, and had the right contacts—but other things were way off that were red flags.

 

 

 

So I queried again with the same book while writing my fourth. I found an awesome and reputable agent who loved that book, was really passionate about it. We went on a couple rounds of submission, got rejections and R & Rs (revise & resubmits) with no result. So we tried my next book and got even fewer bites.

 

 

 

It was around that time that I got an idea for a new adult romance, but I knew my agent only repped YA. I wrote the book anyway and did it with wild abandon. It opened up this new world for me. A world I didn’t realize I was passionate about from the writer’s side, only from the reader’s side. The world of new adult and adult romance.

 

 

 

I had a candid discussion with my agent about my desire to write in a new category/genre and we ended up parting ways. Our goals had become vastly different. And that’s okay. The important thing was to recognize it.

 

 

 

I considered querying a few agents who were accepting NA submissions at that time, but I was also asking myself some tougher questions about my future goals. Did I want to continue with my dream of traditionally publishing my first book or should I go with a smaller press or maybe self-publish? Just keeping it real here. I wanted to be an author and get my book in reader’s hands. But I also wanted to be smart and put out a great product.

 

 

 

So I queried a handful of agents I thought sounded like the right fit, while I studied the market and talked to other writers about their experiences. I got an immediate response from my current agent, Sara Megibow, who asked for the full, and then contacted me with an offer a couple of days later. And this time around felt especially right. We were on the same page, had the same general philosophy and goals. Especially when it came to communication.

 

 

 

It was all such a whirlwind after that. My book went to auction with six publishing houses. I accepted a two-book deal with Penguin. This spring, my fifth and sixth books will publish with the same house. One is a gay romance and the other is an adult contemporary, so I’m still evolving and challenging myself, and I have an agent in my corner who supports all of that.

 

 

 

So my advice to any new or even seasoned writer would be: Ask yourself some difficult questions and then really listen to your gut. It sounds cliché but that little voice inside of you will never lead you astray. If something feels off—with an agent relationship, or your book, or your offer—if you’re not writing in the genres or age categories you’re most wild about, LISTEN!

 

 

 

Ask yourself what you can or should do differently to meet your goal. And then do it—even if it feels uncomfortable and disappointing at first. Because later on the discomfort may be greater.

 

 

Keep trying new things in the general direction of your ultimate dream. Don’t stay static. Always move forward, even in baby steps, to learn and grow and change. Eventually something good will happen!

 

 

 

Christina WOWMother, wife, reader, dreamer. Christina lives in the Midwest with her husband and son–her two favorite guys. She’s addicted to lip gloss and salted caramel everything. She believes in true love and kissing, so writing romance novels has become a dream job.  Author of the Between Breaths series including ALL OF YOU, BEFORE YOU BREAK, WHISPER TO ME, PROMISE ME THIS, and THERE YOU STAND are all available now from Penguin. Her latest release, TWO OF HEARTS, an adult contemporary romance, is now available via Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

 

She is represented by Sara Megibow of The Nelson Literary Agency. Also the creator of Tags-n-Stones (dot com) jewelry. For more on Christina, check out her website, or follow her on Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

 

Monday Musings: All Those Contests June 1, 2015

 

If you look around the internet these days it seems more frequently than ever new writing contests are popping up. They used to be sporadic throughout the year and now it feels like there’s a contest at least once every month.

 

 

If you’re a writer, these contests offer a unique opportunity to hone your query, pitch, and even sometimes your first 250 words or an entire page. In addition, it can get your work in front of some amazing agents who you would otherwise have to query normally via their agency websites (aka “the slush”).

 

 

Personally, I have benefited from some of these contests. When I was still querying it gave me the unique opportunity to polish my work and make great contacts/friends in the writing community. In fact, I’ve been so blessed by these contests that I even host one now with Michelle Hauck every January/February. And this brings me to my point…

 

 

When Michelle and I did our contest this year we had everything buttoned-up. Almost every agent we asked to participate said “yes.” We were both blown away and grateful. Then when it came time, we opened our submission window and “BOOM” within six minutes all 200 spaces were filled. To say we were both shocked is putting it mildly.

 

 

Once all the entries were in, our contest got underway. Our mentors did their jobs (beautifully!) and the posts went up. And then a very sad thing happened. We discovered another person on the internet had started a contest at the same time (a contest that we had never seen advertised – although Michelle and I blew out the doors publicizing ours just to make sure there wasn’t ANY crossover).

 

 

Several of our selections also appeared in the other contest. Agents were not happy about the double entries. We smoothed things over and everything worked out.

 

 

So Amy, where are you going with all this you may be asking? Here’s the deal: there are a lot of contests out there. Each offering a unique opportunity to share your work. What I caution is you choose wisely. Agents are beginning to see many of the same entries over and over and are tiring of it. This causes them to stop participating in contests.

 

 

I get it. Contests cause a frenzy. When you’re proud of your work it makes sense you would want to get it out there. But what I recommend is you take your time and look at what contests can do for you in the broadest scope possible:

 

 

1) Help you improve your submission materials

 

2) Connect you with agents/editors

 

3) Introduce you to possible critique partners

 

 

All these are critical to your process, but they are not the end all be all. If you don’t get selected, don’t let it stop you. Move forward. Improve your craft. Polish up your work as best you can and then send your unsolicited queries. Many times “the slush” gets a bad rap. But I can tell you from personal experience the slush can pay off.

 

 

Yes contests are important, but you can’t get caught up in them. Focus on your goals and your writing. Once you’re ready, polish up that query. Get those submission materials required by the agency ready (because you’ve done your research and YOU ARE following the guidelines) and then send them.

 

 

At that point, the future is out of your hands. Work on something new. Be confident in your writing and know that if this manuscript isn’t the one, the next one might be. Remember to keep improving. Your “yes” could be right around the corner. It could come from a contest or from the slush. The most important thing to remember is that if you want it bad enough you can NEVER GIVE UP.

 

 

Have you entered a writing contest? Did you find it helpful? I’d love to hear about it in the comments.

 

QUITE THE QUERY: Rachel Simon and OF FRAGILE THINGS May 29, 2015

QuiteTheQuery

 

 

 

If you ask any writer about the process of connecting with their agent (or publisher), the majority will say the most difficult part was querying. Not only the actual process of sending out the letters/emails, but formulating the query itself. In fact, I’ve heard more than a few authors say writing their query took them almost as long as drafting their book!

 

 

Some people have the talent of being able to summarize their book in a few sentences. But for those who don’t, I wanted to provide a resource so writers could learn what works, and what doesn’t, in a query.

 

 

With that in mind, I’m pleased to share today’s successful query from Rachel Simon. This great query connected her with her agent, Carrie Howland.

 

 

Dear Carrie:

 

You favorited my #Pitmad pitch (“18yrold Sadie’s sister is home from war. But PTSD isn’t the only thing she brings w/her #pitmad #YA”) and asked to see my query and the first fifty pages.

 

 

All it takes is three letters—M.I.A—to send eighteen-year-old Sadie’s whole world crashing to the ground.

 

 

Her mama believes God will bring her sister back alive from the war, but Sadie knows the truth: Skylar isn’t coming home. While everyone else prays for her sister’s survival, Sadie copes by wrapping herself in the life Skylar left behind — in her sister’s nightmares and her boyfriend’s arms.

 

 

Skylar’s past haunts the corners of Sadie’s mind as secrets come to light. Like the postcards she finds describing a baby she never knew her sister had. Secrets that crush the perfect image she’s had of Skylar.

 

 

Sadie was right about Skylar, but not in the ways she imagined. She’s coming home. Someone who looks and talks like Skylar, but not the same. But Sadie’s not the person she left behind either. And it might just tear them apart. Sadie’s already lost her sister once–can she stand to lose her again?

 

 

My YA contemporary novel, OF FRAGILE THINGS, is complete at 52,000 words. It will appeal to fans of THE SKY IS EVERYWHERE by Jandy Nelson, SOMETHING LIKE NORMAL by Trish Doller, and THE IMPOSSIBLE KNIFE OF MEMORY by Laurie Halse Anderson.


 

 

Fun Tidbit:

 

My fun tidbit is that I landed Carrie through a Twitter pitch contest (and possibly a wedding).

 

 

A few years ago, my cousin got married and one of his wife’s bridesmaids was a literary agent named Carrie Howland. I didn’t think much of it because, at the time, I was working on a different novel for a revise and resubmit opportunity.

 

 

Flash forward to two years later, I had a new novel and weirdly great query stats (I kept refreshing my e-mail when I had 10 queries and 6 full requests; I couldn’t believe it).

 

 

In March 2014 during #PitMad, I threw out a Twitter pitch to this agent, who said to @her because the feeds were going so, so fast and she wanted to make sure she saw YA contemporary pitches. She favorited mine and asked for the first 50 pages. I immediately realized who she was (Carrie Howland! literary agent from my cousin’s wedding!) and froze up. Could I send her my full? Would she immediately reject me because we’d danced the horah together?

 

 

In the end, I told myself the worst that Carrie could do was reject me. She didn’t, to my surprise, and requested the full. In the meantime, I sent more queries and a week after my birthday in May, Carrie offered representation. Best. Birthday. Present. Ever!

 

 

For those wondering – here are my query stats: 30 queries, 5 partial requests, 1 revise and resubmit offer, 18 full requests, 4 offers.

 

 

Since signing with Carrie, we did many rounds of revisions and while the same themes are in the query above, the manuscript itself changed quite a bit.

 

 

I’m always a contest pusher when people are unsure of whether to partake in them or not.

 

 

Do it. There is no harm! :-)

 

 

Rachel SimonRachel Simon is a YA contemporary writer represented by Carrie Howland of Donadio & Olson. She’s from New Jersey (where she learned to say “huge” without the H, much to her critique partner’s chagrin) and now lives in Boston (where she does not drop her Rs). She received her B.A. in Creative Writing in 2012 and will receive a certificate in Publishing in August 2014. She likes traveling, tea, and nice boys in YA. You can find out more about her at her blog or follow her on Twitter.

 

Cover Reveal: Brenda Drake’s LIBRARY JUMPERS May 28, 2015

Filed under: Blog,Cover reveal,Publishing,YA Fiction — chasingthecrazies @ 6:54 am
Tags: , ,

 

 

Brenda Drake has done amazing things for the writing community. Year after year, she tirelessly puts together opportunities to connect agents and editors with writers via her contests like: Pitch Wars and Pitch Madness. On top of that there is also the infamous #PitMad, Twitter pitch contest, that I know has connected many writers to their agents.

 

 

So what better way to say “Thank You” to Brenda for her years of service to the writing community than to shout from the rooftops about her book’s cover reveal.

 

 

Here’s a bit about LIBRARY JUMPERS…

 

 

Gia Kearns would rather fight with boys than kiss them. That is, until Arik, a leather clad hottie in the Boston Athenaeum, suddenly disappears. While examining the book of world libraries he abandoned, Gia unwittingly speaks the key that sucks her and her friends into a photograph and transports them into a Paris library, where Arik and his Sentinels—magical knights charged with protecting humans from the creatures traveling across the gateway books—rescue them from a demonic hound.

 

Jumping into some of the world’s most beautiful libraries would be a dream come true for Gia, if she weren’t busy resisting her heart or dodging an exiled wizard seeking revenge on both the Mystik and human worlds. Add a French flirt obsessed with Arik and a fling with a young wizard, and Gia must choose between her heart and her head, between Arik’s world and her own, before both are destroyed.

 

 

And here’s the gorgeous cover from Entangled Teen that actually made me gasp…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

library jumpers_500

 (Available January 5, 2016)

 

 

 

 

Congratulations to Brenda and the entire Entangled Teen team on this stunning cover!

 

Want to add on Goodreads or Pre-Order? See links below!

 

 

 

 

 

BBrenda Drake Author Photorenda Drake, the youngest of three children, grew up an Air Force brat and the continual new kid at school until her family settled in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Brenda’s fondest memories growing up are of her eccentric Irish grandmother’s animated tales, which gave her a strong love of storytelling. So it was only fitting that she would choose to write young adult and middle grade novels with a bend toward the fantastical. When Brenda’s not writing or doing the social media thing, she’s haunting libraries, bookstores, and coffee shops or reading someplace quiet and not at all exotic (much to her disappointment). For more on Brenda, check out her website, or follow her on Goodreads, Twitter or Facebook.

 

 

 

Add to Goodreads

Pre-order opportunities:  Amazon or Barnes and Noble.

 

Monday Musings: Writing Strong Female Characters May 25, 2015

Filed under: Blog,Publishing,writing craft — chasingthecrazies @ 6:45 am
Tags: , , ,

 

 

Buffy

 

 

 

 

At the RT Convention last week I attended a session titled, “Writing Strong Female Heroines.” Renowned authors like Richelle Mead (Vampire Academy series), Lauren Oliver (The Delirium series), and Kresley Cole (Immortals After Dark series ) were among the panelists.

 

 

In the course of the session each author spoke about how they created their female characters and what the end goal was for each. No matter what each writer said, they all agreed on one point: whether their characters were warriors, or struggling in a dystopian society, they had to have layers and make both good and bad choices in order to be believable.

 

 

While I wholeheartedly agree with these points, I have to state that writing strong female heroines (no matter how many layers they have) is still a HUGE struggle.

 

 

In the last two books I’ve written, my female leads have had a very clear vision of their goals. They’re driven and highly focused on what they want/need and are not ashamed of their place in the world. But no matter how hard I try to make them three-dimensional, I still get push back on the level of their strength.

 

I’ll often get comments like, “Would she really make that decision?” or “Wow! That comment seems harsh.”  While frustrating, because I know I’d never get these comments if I was writing a male character, this kind of feedback pushes me to fully embrace every spectrum of what it means to be a woman.

 

 

When writing females I try to remember the following:

 

1) You can let them make bad decisions.

 

2) It’s okay to let them be surly – even when people insist the character should be more vulnerable.

 

3) They can fight for what they want and not be ashamed of their ambition.

 

4) They embrace standing on their own two feet.

 

5) When confronted with conflict, they handle their own battles knowing “Prince Charming” is not going to ride in and save the day, and are perfectly okay with that reality.

 

6) A quiet heroine can still be a powerful heroine.

 

 

 

 

Hermione

 

 

 

 

For me this is not some huge statement on women and their place in the current world, but more of a real view of women in my own day-to-day landscape.

 

 

I have female friends who are pilots and doctors. Family members who are high-powered attorneys and successful business owners. Not once have any of these women apologized for going after their dreams. For putting off marriage and children to fulfill their career goals. Each of them goes about their business, quietly kicking ass, and not being ashamed for wanting to be successful.

 

 

This is the true female character I want to share in my books. And even though I might still get pushback on their level of strength, or unabashed quest to achieve their dreams, I won’t stop writing them. These are the real women who are out in the world. I believe they deserve to be portrayed in the pages of books, and I’ll keep writing them without shadowing any part of their life (whether good or bad) because this is the true and diverse reality of women today.

 

 

Do you write strong female heroines? How do you balance their character? I’d love to hear about it in the comments.

 

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,371 other followers

%d bloggers like this: