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W.O.W. – Writer Odyssey Wednesday with Sarah Guillory July 23, 2014

WOW

 

 

 

Passion. As a writer it’s what drives us. Passion for the written word. For building a story that transports readers to another place and time. It’s also passion that allows us to focus on our dream of being published. In today’s W.O.W., featured author, Sarah Guillory, talks about passion and how as a teacher she encourages her students to find their passion, whatever it may be, and turn it into something that drives them. Great advice for any of us navigating the crazy world of publishing.

 

Many thanks to Sarah for sharing her writing odyssey today…

 

 

Amy: When did you first begin seriously writing with the intent of wanting to be published?

Sarah: I began writing seriously in the fall of 2009, though I’m not so sure I really believed I would be published. “Seriously” to me meant writing every day. I wrote my first novel over three months that fall, and it was the most exciting and exhilarating experience, but, to be honest, I think I always knew that book wasn’t “the one.” It was my practice novel. It wasn’t until I began revising my first draft of RECLAIMED (summer of 2011) that I realized how badly I wanted it to be published.

 

 

Amy: You currently teach high school English. Do your students inspire your story ideas?

Sarah: I get asked this question a lot, but they really don’t. My characters and their stories come to me through dreams, songs, newspaper articles, etc, but I’ve never had an idea or character come from a student. I’ve stolen a last name and an allergy from a student, but I’ve never had one be an inspiration for a character or idea.

 

 

Amy: One of the things I loved about RECLAIMED was the distinctive voices. Do you find it hard to write male POV?

Sarah: Thank you! The easy answer would be to say yes, but it’s not really the truth. I didn’t really have to work much on Luke’s voice – it came to me fully-formed. I struggled a bit with Ian’s, but honestly, Jenna’s voice was much harder to get right. But my current project also has both male and female POVs, and her voice was easier than his this time around.

 

 

Amy: How many manuscripts had you written prior to RECLAIMED? Was the query process long for you or did it go smoothly?

Sarah: I’d only written one other manuscript prior to RECLAIMED, and I only sent a few queries out. As I mentioned before, it never felt like “the one.” With RECLAIMED, I queried on and off for about a year, but sent queries out only one or two at a time. I know most people advise against that, but I researched agents extensively before sending it out, and research takes time. So I would send it out, do more research, and send more out a few months later. My query letters are never good, so I put it up in the forums at WriteonCon, which is where my editor at Spencer Hill found it. I got my agent, Marcy Posner, with my newest project, about three months after I began querying it.

 

 

Amy: Do you use beta readers or critique partners? If so, how instrumental are they to your writing process?

Sarah: I have the most amazing critique partners, but I found them late in the revising process for RECLAIMED. I’d already done several rounds of revisions on my own, no beta readers (other than family). They really helped tighten it up. With my newest project, I had two beta readers as well as my two critique partners. I never send them rough drafts, because my rough drafts are exceptionally rough. I do at least one round of revisions before I send it to them. They leave detailed inline notes and don’t let me get away with being sloppy or lazy AT ALL. I love that about them.

 

 

Amy: What can you tell me about your “call” with your agent, Marcy Posner? How did you know she was the right fit for you?

Sarah: My call with my agent is probably a little different, since I was sitting in the National Gallery of Art. We both had crazy schedules prior to the call, and I was out of town the next time we were both available, so I spent the morning looking at paintings, had a nice lunch (including a glass of wine to calm me down), and went upstairs to chat with her. But the phone call was a formality at that point. I knew Marcy was the right fit for me when she sent me her edit letter. She sent it to me prior to our phone call so we could discuss it when she called. It was an amazing letter – the parts she loved were the parts I loved, and the areas where she suggested work were places I knew needed attention. She spent an entire paragraph talking about punctuation, and she referenced both Faulkner and John Donne. This English teacher swooned.

 

 

Amy: Was there ever a time you thought about giving up on your writing dream? If so, what motivated you to keep writing?

Sarah: There was never a moment when I gave up on my writing dream, although there were a few times when I was frustrated and wondered if pursuing publication was worth the stress. But I knew I would never give up writing, because I couldn’t. I’d tried. I’d told myself for years I wasn’t talented enough to be a writer, and yet, even when I tried to do other things, I found myself stopping and writing from time to time. I couldn’t keep myself from writing. Scenes and sentences would float through my mind and I would hurry to scribble them down. When you’re a writer, you’re a WRITER – it’s what you do even when you know it might break your heart. But I am also very stubborn, so I continued to pursue publication, even on the days when it was hard.

 

 

Amy: I’m sure your writing success has inspired your students. What do you tell them about the ups and downs of publishing and pursuing their dreams?

Sarah: The one thing I want for all of my students is for them to be able to pursue their passions – whatever form they take – and I tell them that the only person who can stop you from pursuing those passions is you. I stood in my own way for a long time. But if it’s something you are passionate about, that will sustain you through the inevitable ups and downs. I did well in school, and I run marathons, and now I write books, and sometimes I can tell my students think it is because I am “good” at these things. I let them know up front that my life has less to do with talent and much more to do with hard work. I did well in school because I studied. I finish marathons because I train. And I write books because I sit down and write almost every day. I’m stubborn. I love books and reading and words more than almost anything – I always have. Books are my passion, and I will spend my life pursuing that passion. Stubbornness and love – that’s really what it comes down to.

 

 

 

 

 

 

reclaimed

 

 

 

 

Jenna Oliver doesn’t have time to get involved with one boy, let alone two.

 

All Jenna wants is to escape her evaporating small town and her alcoholic mother. She’s determined she’ll go to college and find a life that is wholly hers—one that isn’t tainted by her family’s past. But when the McAlister twins move to town and Jenna gets involved with both of them, she learns the life she planned may not be the one she gets.

 

Ian McAlister doesn’t want to start over; he wants to remember.

 

Ian can’t recall a single thing from the last three months—and he seems to be losing more memories every day. His family knows the truth, but no one will tell him what really happened before he lost his memory. When he meets Jenna, Ian believes that he can be normal again because she makes not remembering something he can handle.

 

The secret Ian can’t remember is the one Luke McAlister can’t forget.

 

Luke has always lived in the shadow of his twin brother until Jenna stumbles into his life. She sees past who he’s supposed to be, and her kiss brings back the spark that life stole. Even though Luke feels like his brother deserves her more, Luke can’t resist Jenna—which is the trigger that makes Ian’s memory return.

 

Jenna, Ian, & Luke are about to learn there are only so many secrets you can keep before the truth comes to reclaim you.

 

 

Available for purchase via Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and other book retailers.

 

 

SarahGSarah Guillory has always loved words and had a passion for literature.  When she’s not reading or writing, Sarah runs marathons, which she credits with keeping her at least partially sane.  Sarah teaches high school English and lives in Louisiana with her husband and their bloodhound, Gus. Her debut novel, Reclaimed, recently won a Silver Independent Publishers Award and is a finalist for the 2013 Foreword Book of the Year.

Website: www.sarahguillory.com

Blog: http://sarahguillory.blogspot.com/

Twitter: @sguillory262

Tumblr: http://sarahguillory.tumblr.com/

 

 

QUERY 101 SERIES : Handling the “Call” – Guest Post from Literary Agent Pooja Menon July 18, 2014

Query 101B

 

Finally, the queries are sent. You wait and wait for replies, and then one day your email pings with a request. You shoot the full manuscript out to the requesting agent, and then you wait (and sometimes wait and wait again) until you get the dreaded rejection OR the lovely email titled, “Can we talk?”

 

First, if this happens, it’s okay to freak out a little. Do a “Muppet Flail” and perhaps even a little booty shake. You’ve worked very hard to get to this point and you’ve earned a victory shimmy. But once the adrenaline finishes pumping out of your system, you have to take a deep breath and think, “What do I do next? Should I ask about revisions? Or what about the next book I’m writing?” All good questions, but there are a myriad of other things you need to think about before that important call.

 

Today, I’ve asked Literary Agent, Pooja Menon of Kimberley Cameron and Associates, to share what she thinks are important things a writer should ponder and ask about during their “call.”

 

 

 

 “The Call”

By Pooja Menon

 

 

Writing a book is not an easy business. Anyone who tells you it is or should be doesn’t really have a clue about what goes into writing a full length book. Coming up with an original plot, fleshing out characters that are relatable and unique, minding the pacing, creating plot twists…phew! It’s definitely a labor of love, sweat and tears. And then you have the querying process. Another episode of nail biting stress, tears, and ultimately, when that offer comes into your inbox wrapped in a shiny red bow: extreme happiness! You deserve this moment, so does your baby. All of this leads to the ultimate moment of reckoning: THE CALL. This is the moment when you decide if the offer you’ve received is the best option for you and your baby. This is also that moment where, before you get on the train that never stops–revising, going out on submission, getting a deal, getting published, etc–where sometimes you feel like things are slipping out of your hands, YOU have the power to decide the next step. Sometimes you might have one offer, and sometimes you might have multiple offers and deciding among all the offers you receive can be a tense, brain-cramping experience. But it’s also such an exhilarating one.

 

So what makes the call so important (and nerve-wracking)? It’s the conversation that determines whether you and the agent ‘click’. The space where you and the agent can really get to know each other. Considering the agent-author relationship is usually a long-term business relationship, it’s so important to be able to connect with each other as people and as business partners with the same vision and outlook, the same work ethic. It’s a relationship in which you might find yourself having to do uncomfortable things (such as revise and get critiqued), where you’re going to have to trust someone else’s opinion on what is best for the work you’ve worked so hard on. None of this is easy. But, if you really invest in the call to get to know your prospective agent, then this process can actually be an enjoyable one. Having that one person fighting in your corner for your project, that one person with whom you can discuss your worries about your work, about the whole publishing process in general, someone to watch your back and make sure you get the best deal possible, who is equally invested in the success of your book: it can be such a positive, strengthening experience in what is mostly a lonely profession that can at times move as fast as lightening or as slow as a tortoise.

 

SO, how can the whole experience be made easier? Well, here are somethings to think about:

 

1) Research the agent/agents who’ve offered you representation. Read their website pages, blogs, interviews, find out what they’re looking for, what they’ve sold, who they represent, how comfortable or connected you feel to the way they come off to you from all of the above (trust your intuition!). Do you feel positive?

 

2) Look to see what questions they’ve already answered from all of the above places before you craft your questions. If an agent has already answered a question dozens of times during an interview or blog post, asking them the same thing is a waste of time, especially when you can use that time to ask other, more pressing questions. Also, we agents really appreciate authors who’ve made the effort to research our interests.

 

3) This is a call to talk about your work, so take a deep breath, find your enthusiasm, and dive into it. Agents are people just like you. Keep your nervousness aside, they want to talk to you about your book, the book they loved so much they want to work with you on it. This is a good space to find out what they loved about your work, and which areas they thought needed work. It is important not to make this call session sound like an inquisition or a grill session. That is uncomfortable and somewhat unnatural (to me). I want to get to know you as a person and an author. And I’m open to any questions you might have, but try as best as you can not to make an agent feel like she’s taking the stand :).

 

4) No question is a dumb question, so don’t hold back or be shy about something you want to know. Most of us would rather you laid things out on the table upfront, before we get into a work relationship. It’s much harder and messier to deal with the discovery that the agent and author have different visions and expectations after we’ve signed together. So be upfront with the agent about your vision for the project. Also, find out what genres they do represent and don’t (if you can’t find this from your research). If you like to write across different genres, you want to be sure the agent represents them.

 

5) As agents, what we are looking for most in a prospective client are the following attributes: a friendly, upbeat attitude, someone who is respectful of our time, flexible, understands that sometimes there aren’t enough work hours in the day, so is patient for a response, someone who constantly challenges themselves with projects, tries to keep abreast of the market and what’s coming out and what has been overdone, has an interest in wanting to promote themselves on social media (if you don’t have social media pages, agents will definitely help you set things up, but it’s up to the author to do the actual legwork, that means authors who are willing to do whatever it takes to get their author profile out, to connect with prospective readers and fellow writers), and most importantly, someone who is willing to dive into revisions with a positive attitude.

 

On a daily basis, agents read tons of manuscripts as well as books outside of work. Having read so many, and having interacted with editors on a constant basis, we have a good idea of what works and doesn’t work in today’s market. So any advice we give will not only be a fresh, objective perspective, but it’ll also be one that takes all of the above things into consideration (trends, demand, editor wish lists, snappy writing, unique plot, etc). So it’s in the author’s best interest to hear us out and trust our judgement. Definitely, we want our authors to have their own opinions if they feel strongly about something. But be open and willing to talk about it respectfully and honestly, and be willing to listen and accept advice, because, at the end, we both have the same goal. To make the book the strongest it can be. So trust the agent to do her job, just as she trusts you as an author to do yours.

 

6) Be warm and enthusiastic on the phone. Sound interested. I know this is an odd point, and I haven’t had this experience many times. But a few times, when I’ve picked up the phone to talk to an author, the author’s tone has thrown me off. I understand such a disconnected or uninterested tone can be the outcome of nervousness. But this does more harm that good. Such a conversation space makes it very hard for the agent to be warm and upbeat and excited about the project if the person on the other end doesn’t mirror the same emotions. This is YOUR book, we expect you to be excited, we expect you to talk our ear off about your dreams and visions and projects. If what we get on the other line is the sound of chirping crickets whenever we stop talking, or a nonchalant reply to our questions, then to me that is a red flag. I want to look forward to talking to my clients. My authors and I work very closely, brainstorming ideas and edit notes, discussing the submission process, etc. We’re in touch a lot. If I’m going to feel that dreaded feeling in the pit of my stomach whenever I have to do these things with an author, that relationship is definitely not going to work out. In a lot of cases, YOU can chart the course and tone of how the relationship with your agent goes. So be mindful of that.

 

7) BE YOURSELF. I know this is simple advice and probably sounds silly. But no need to ‘put your best foot forward’ or ‘your best self forward’. You can’t consistently be your best self 24/7, neither can we.

 

8) Have realistic expectations about the publishing business. This is a business of passion and dreams. Of stories. At the same time, this is not an industry that moves all that fast, and sometimes that can be disappointing and frustrating, like beating your head against a wall. But have faith and be positive, and be willing to continue to put your 100% in your work and in your agent. Just as you’re working on your book, she’s working to get your book out there. There’s no point in being angry and dissatisfied by the pace of the industry, or the speed with which your agent works. Trust that she/he knows what they’re doing.

 

I’ve heard stories where authors get annoyed at their agents for not subbing to as many editors as they’d like, or to specific editors that they’d like. It is very claustrophobic for an agent to work in an atmosphere where the author is constantly questioning or second-guessing their choices or their work. Trust that they know who the best people are for your particular manuscript. By all means, if you have a dream editor, let your agent know, but do not email her weekly with editors you think she should query. She probably has a good reason for not subbing to too many agents at one time or subbing to only specific editors from specific houses. That is one aspect of our job, to know whom to submit to and where to submit to, so take a breath and focus on another project, keep your mind busy. Know that an agent can’t control the speed with which things in the industry moves, we can’t control the speed of editors’ responses or manipulate their tastes. It can become very easy to blame someone else for things like that. But be wary of that. The agenting community is a small one, and such an attitude can quickly be more alienating than helpful. Also, consider that an agent is juggling not just one client but many, and trying to find homes for not just one project but many. So be realistic about your expectations, and patient.

 

9) Lastly, at the end of the call, be pleasant. Thank the agent for calling. Just as you like to keep the phone feeling warm and fuzzy, we do too! :)

 

Some questions to consider asking during THE CALL:

 

1) What are the terms of the representation being offered? Is the agent interested in representing one book or is she looking for something long-term?

 

2) Once you sign together, what happens next? What is her submission process like?

 

3) Is there an author-agent agreement? Will you be spending money out of your pocket at any time-mailing, copies, faxes, phone calls, any other fees?

 

4) What happens if you want to terminate your relationship with your agent?

 

5) Once terminated, will you get back all the unsold rights for your projects?

 

6) Ask about the agent’s recent sales. If you’re talking to a new agent, find out if the agency she works for has a healthy amount of recent sales, if the agency is a reputable agency, what they represent, etc.

 

7) Who handles the film rights, foreign rights, and audio rights?

 

8) How often does the agent touch base with the author?

 

9) Does the agent prefer phone, email, or either mode is fine?

 

10) Does the agent let you know where and when she’s going to submit your work?

 

11) Will they forward rejections letters to you?

 

12) Does the agent consult the author before making decisions on the offers they receive? Does the agent make decisions on behalf of the client?

 

13) What is the process of receiving payments or royalties? Does the agent process it first and send it to the author, or does the author get their payment directly from the publisher? If the money is being sent to the agent first, how long will it take for the agent to send the author her checks?

 

14) How hands-on is the agent?

 

15) In terms of your own work, what editorial suggestions does the agent have? How close is the book to going out on sub?

 

16) Will the agent help with career planning? What about helping with publicizing your work (this is something an agent can definitely help you on by guiding you, but the main legwork has to be done by the author)?

 

17) What editors/publishers does the agent have in mind for the author’s book?

 

18) If you want to write in a different genre or category someday, what is the agent’s opinion on that?

 

19) What happens if the agent doesn’t like your next book?

 

Note: questions like: How long has the agent been an agent, how long have they been in publishing, is the agent listed in Publishers Marketplace, etc are all information you can most often find on their websites or by doing a bit of research. As agents, we all work differently. Best thing to do is to see which method of working is most comfortable to you, suits you most, and go with your intuition.

 

On an end note, don’t be nervous. Think of us as your best allies in this infuriatingly wonderful world of publishing. And remember, the reason we’re having this conversation in the first place is because we were simply blown away by your masterpiece :), and we want to work with you and represent the amazing author that you are. So, try and get to us know, like we want to get to know you.

 

PoojaPooja Menon joined Kimberley Cameron & Associates as an intern in the fall of 2011, with the aim of immersing herself in the elusive world of books and publishing. She soon realized that being an agent was what she was most drawn to as the job was varied and challenging. In the fall of 2012, she began taking on her own clients. As a relatively new agent, Pooja is looking to build her client list and is eager for submissions by debut novelists and veteran writers. She represents both Adult and YA fiction/non-fiction and select Middle Grade.

 

 

First Five Frenzy with Elizabeth Harding of Curtis Brown LTD July 11, 2014

FFF SideWords

 

 

If you’re like me, you toil for hours editing and fine-tuning the first pages of your manuscript. You look at the first lines to make sure they are compelling and tight. You examine the next few paragraphs, hoping your MC’s voice is already taking hold of the reader.

 

The First Five Frenzy is all about getting an agent’s perspective on what works, and what fails, in those first pages of a manuscript. By reading each agent’s comments, I hope you’ll learn how to make your manuscript a shining gem that will be requested time and time again.

 

Today, I am proud to share Literary Agent, Elizabeth Harding’s perspective on what’s important in those critical first pages.

 

 

Amy: Many writers have the impression that a great first line is imperative to drawing in the reader. How important is a first line to you as an agent?

 

Elizabeth: I am a patient reader, so for me the first line doesn’t make or break my decision to continue reading. But a pedestrian opening paragraph certainly can color my mindset as I read through the opening pages.

 

 

Amy: Many times a writer is told to stay away from common openings like dreams, eating breakfast, riding in a car, etc. What are some common openings you recommend writers stay away from?

 

Elizabeth: The types of common openings that you mention as something to avoid are all symptoms of the main problem – starting the book before the actual story begins. I think it behooves authors to honor the beginning of their story and not try to wrap it up in pretty packaging that might serve more to detract the reader than draw in the reader.

 

 

Amy: When you’ve responded to a writer to request a partial or full manuscript, what was it about their first pages that piqued your interest?

 

Elizabeth: I’m not sure there is a singular reason, to be honest. Sometimes I ask for a manuscript because the genre is one that helps fill a hole on my list. Or the subject happens to be of personal interest to me. But always I have to feel like this is a writer who can tell a story and develop a character. Over the past 2-3 years, the overall quality of the partial or full manuscripts that I’ve requested based on emailed queries seems higher than in year’s past, so I see a lot of writing that is ‘fine’ or ‘above average.’ And by this I mean writing where I probably will read the entire manuscript if I requested it just because I want to know what happened, but not writing that I necessarily would remember in detail as I moved to the next project. But when I see first pages where it is clear that the writing is elevated or the characters and plot feel fresh and not derivative, I always find it exciting and enticing.

 

 

Amy: What are some common mistakes writers make in their first five pages?

 

Elizabeth: I’ve seen plenty of opening pages which I consider to be overwritten from a descriptive language standpoint. I do think it is important as a writer to let your ability to set the stage – tone, setting, atmosphere, etc. – shine in the opening pages, but unless I have an idea of the voice and a general sense of the direction of the manuscript, I think the opening pages aren’t working the way they should to help frame the reader’s expectation of what is to come.

 

 

Amy: What resonates with you most in those first pages? Voice? Pacing? Unique concept?

 

Elizabeth: For me, I think it always comes down to an authentic and accessible voice. Unless I connect with the voice and lose myself in it relatively quickly, I usually feel a disconnect with the writing, regardless of a snappy pace or a unique concept or plot.

 

 

Elizabeth Harding represents authors and illustrators of juvenile, middle-grade, young adult and teen fiction at Curtis Brown (www.curtisbrown.com). Elizabeth started at the agency as an assistant to the legendary Marilyn E. Marlow, and she has been at Curtis Brown for more than seventeen years. Elizabeth represents New York Times bestsellers, Newberry, National Book Award, Printz and Coretta Scott King honor award winners. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan (Go Blue!) and lives in Manhattan with her husband and three young boys. @ehardingnyc

 

If you are interested in submitting to Elizabeth, please check the Curtis Brown website for guidelines.

 

 

 

 

 

W.O.W. – Writer Odyssey Wednesday with A.L. Sonnichsen July 9, 2014

WOW

 

When you first start writing a manuscript I think one of the hardest thing to do is find the character’s voice. From the first page it has to be strong and distinctive, and as a writer you may have to get several pages, or chapters, into a first draft before you discover if it’s working or not. In today’s W.O.W., A.L. Sonnichsen shares how her debut, RED BUTTERFLY, started as Young Adult book, but along the way she discovered the story was much better suited to a Middle Grade voice. While it meant rewriting the entire book, it also meant she found the proper voice for her protagonist. A daring and brave choice that eventually paid off!

 

Many thanks to A.L. for sharing her writing odyssey today…

 

 

Amy: When did you first begin seriously writing with the intent of wanting to be published?

 

A.L.: I grew up writing books and even majored in writing in college, but it wasn’t until I was turning thirty that I decided to get serious. That was seven years ago now, so it took some time. I’ve learned a lot and I’m so grateful for those years of growth.

 

 

Amy: When did you complete your first Middle Grade manuscript?

 

A.L.: I wrote young adult novels for years. In fact, I was sure my passion was young adult. What I couldn’t understand, though, was why all my favorite books to read were middle grade, and yet, I couldn’t come up with a middle grade plot to save my life! One of my critique partners, in reading a young adult manuscript of mine, told me something that would change my life. She said, “I know this might be devastating to you, but the voice in this manuscript feels wrong. She seems way younger than a teenager!” So, I went back to the drawing board and completely rewrote the book as a middle grade novel. That was a couple years ago and the book turned out to be RED BUTTERFLY, my debut novel. The moral of this story is: listen to your critique partners. Another moral might be: if you’re hitting a brick wall with one genre, try another. Now that I’ve written one middle grade, all my ideas are middle grade and I can’t imagine writing anything else. Weird, huh?

 

 

Amy: I love that you’ve spent a good deal of your life living in Hong Kong. How has that experience influenced your writing?

 

A.L.: Growing up in Hong Kong has influenced my writing so much. When I was a kid I kind of hated that I lived there. Not that life was bad—I had a great childhood—but I felt so different from a “real” American kid and I didn’t understand why I couldn’t be normal (whatever that is). Now I’m so grateful for my upbringing. My novel, RED BUTTERFLY, is set in mainland China and I’m working on another manuscript that’s set in Hong Kong. My settings aren’t the only aspects effected. Because I grew up in Hong Kong, I was inspired to go back to Asia as an adult, and that’s where I gained the experiences and inspiration I needed to write RED BUTTERFLY.

 

 

Amy: When you were writing RED BUTTERFLY did you share it with beta readers and/or critique partners? If so, how did they influence your process?

 

A.L.: Yes, I have a trusted group of critique partners. I know everyone has a different system when it comes to polishing their work. For me, I finish a draft, hand it off to a critique partner, receive feedback, and then usually rewrite (or make changes if I’ve already written several drafts). If it’s later in the process, I might have several critique partners read at the same time, just to measure their reaction to see if I’m getting close to sending it out into the big world. With these last readers (who I realize are more like beta readers than critique partners), I gauge how long it takes them to get back to me. If it takes a month or more, I figure I need to tighten up the book and make it more interesting before sending it out. If I’m getting feedback that they can’t put it down, that’s a good sign.

 

 

Amy: How laborious/frustrating was the query process for you?

 

A.L.: Querying before I had an agent wasn’t so bad. I was able to develop a tough skin over time. My attitude was that if I was getting a lot of rejections it was because my book (or my query) weren’t ready yet; I tried not to blame the system. This attitude always kept me working hard on my craft and trying to improve. I also queried widely, but not desperately. I didn’t dredge the bottom of the barrel. I always forced myself to shelve the book that wasn’t going anywhere and write something new. In fact, while I was querying, I made it a point to work on something new. This gave me a forward momentum that helped preserve my sanity.

 

I will say, the toughest querying process I faced was after I signed with one agent and then had to part ways with her. I felt like I was back at square one and that was debilitating. But more on that in the next question….

 

 

Amy: How many agents did you query for RED BUTTERFLY?

 

A.L.: I did not query very many (maybe, five?) because, like I said in my answer to the last question, I was debilitated. I queried a few, received rejections or silence, and was about ready to give up and shelve the book prematurely. I almost made the mistake of listening to my first agent who told me she didn’t think RED BUTTERFLY had a chance. Usually I’m adamant that writers listen to critique (especially from agents!), but in this case, my gut told me she hadn’t actually given my book a good read because she was disappointed my first book hadn’t sold.

 

Thankfully, one of my critique partners came to my rescue and talked to her agent about me. I had received a previous offer from that agent, and my critique partner asked her if she might be interested in reading my newest books. That agent was willing, and, after reading, enthusiastic about my work. Her confidence in my books helped restore my mojo after that first-agent experience.

 

 

Amy: Did you receive instantaneous response or did you have to wait for requests/rejections?

 

A.L.: Querying is such a roller coaster, such a hurry-up-and-wait game! You can wait for weeks, then be scrambling to send someone a partial or a full that meet their specifications. My experience with RED BUTTERFLY was a little different because I already had my foot in the door, so to speak. But even with a foot in the door, the waiting seemed endless. I tried to fill my waiting time with as much writing as possible!

 

 

Amy: What was your call like with your agent, Kate Schafer Testerman? How did you know she was the right fit for you?

 

A.L.: That call was wonderful! *happy sigh* I felt very comfortable with Kate and was so happy that she loved my books. I also needed the assurance that she was going to stick with me whether my books sold or not. With my past agent experience, that was very important to me.

 

 

Amy: As many writers know the publishing world is very hard to break into. What was the one thing you did to help garner agent attention?

 

A.L.: The first time I heard about Kate, my agent, was when I entered a Miss Snark’s First Victim contest with my very, very first book. Kate was the Secret Agent and liked my writing and wanted to see a partial. This was a book that was getting nothing but rejections from EVERYBODY (because the plot stunk). Of course, she gently rejected me after the partial, but her interest kept me going, and it’s an awesome and ironic thing that she’s now my agent!

 

 

Amy: If you were giving a keynote speech at a writers conference, what would be the most important piece of writing advice you would share?

 

A.L.: Persevere! That means, finish the book you’re in the middle of writing. It also means, when querying, keep querying. And if it’s time to move on, get that new idea down on paper. Keep moving forward. Focus on improvement. You can’t control trends or agent/editor interest, but you can perfect your craft and develop good work habits that will help you so much when you do land a contract.

 

 

 

 

Front Cover - Red Butterfly

 

 

 

Kara never met her birth mother. Abandoned as an infant, she was taken in by an elderly American woman living in China. Now eleven, Kara spends most of her time in their apartment, wondering why she and Mama cannot leave the city of Tianjin and go live with Daddy in Montana. Mama tells Kara to be content with what she has … but what if Kara secretly wants more?

 

Told in lyrical, moving verse, Kara’s story is one of a girl learning to trust her own voice, discovering that love and family are limitless, and finding the wings she needs to reach new heights.

 

 

A.L.SonnichsenA.L. Sonnichsen is a Hong Kong-raised mom of five, football coach’s wife, and Brussels sprouts-addicted middle grade writer represented by Kate Schafer Testerman of kt literary. Her middle grade verse novel, RED BUTTERFLY (Simon & Schuster BFYR), will be out in February, 2015. You can find her at her blog, The Green Bathtub ( http://alsonnichsen.blogspot.com ), on facebook as A.L. Sonnichsen ( https://www.facebook.com/AuthorALSonnichsen?ref=hl ), and on twitter at @alsonnichsen.

 

“Behind The Scenes” of a W.O.W. with Dahlia Adler June 25, 2014

 

When I first started my W.O.W. series in 2012 one of the first people who agreed to, and was very supportive of, the series was Dahlia Adler. But I’ll admit something to you all, I was terrified to reach out to her. Looking back now I laugh because Dahlia is the kindest and sweetest person, but I was afraid to approach her because she knew SO MUCH about publishing and I knew VERY LITTLE. Would she think I was some sort of newbie goof trying to pass myself off as a real blogger when I sent my request? Would she respond at all? If you know Dahlia, then you know my worries were completely unfounded. She was incredibly kind and very generous in offering up the story behind her writing odyssey.

 

Now, with the release of her book, BEHIND THE SCENES, I thought it would be fun to share her W.O.W. again. I hope it inspires you as much as it did me!

 

 

WOW

 

 

Social media is a crazy thing.  It let’s us promote our work to others.  It allows us to learn about images and ideas worlds away. But one of the most amazing things about Facebook, Instagram and Twitter is the ability to connect with like-minded people who share the same goals, ideas and dreams, especially when it comes to writing.

 

I first connected with today’s featured author, Dahlia Adler, via Twitter.  I loved her honest advice about writing and publishing, but also her keen insight into what it takes to perfect your craft.  If you haven’t read her blog already, The Daily Dahlia, you should.  She is always sharing tips on how to improve your work and  providing valuable information on the publishing world.  Just recently she posted a gem about what life is like after getting an agent. It’s a great and eye-opening read.

 

Many thanks to Dahlia for sharing her writing journey…

 

 

Amy: I know you’re a freelance editor, reading several manuscripts a week. How do you make time to write?

 

Dahlia: With great difficulty! Honestly, it’s a huge challenge, especially on top of having a full-time job, but I respond really well to goals and deadlines and that helps me a lot in terms of prioritizing and forcing myself to get things done. Also, my husband gets a huge shout-out here for being wonderfully supportive. There are days he gets me for maybe an hour at dinner and then I disappear into my office and he is never anything short of wonderful about it.

 

 

Amy: What drew you to write YA fiction?

 

Dahlia: I’m the youngest by a considerable gap so I started reading YA from an extremely young age because that’s what was around. I grew up with a somewhat unusual background, being Modern Orthodox Jewish and attending yeshiva for elementary and high school, so for me, it was a fascinating insight into the world at large that I never really felt a part of but loved watching on TV. Then I realized I could insert myself into that world in a way by writing. I was about eight years old when I started writing YA, and I’ve never looked back.

 

 

Amy: How many completed manuscripts did you query before one garnered interest?

 

Dahlia: I queried two manuscripts before the one that got me my agent. Both actually got a lot of requests but ultimately both now live solely on my hard drive.

 

 

Amy: If one manuscript was continuing to get rejected, how did you know it was time to move on to a new project?

 

Dahlia: I stopped querying my first one fairly quickly, because it was set in college and those were almost impossible to sell at the time. When you’re getting rejections that aren’t so much about the content of your manuscript but about the fact that they don’t fit into the market, it’s a pretty good clue that it’s just not the right time. I queried the other one for a lot longer, but some of the critique I got from agents on the full made me realize that it needed an overhaul I wasn’t quite sure how to do yet. Honestly, I’m still not, though I’d love to figure it out so I can revive it one day. I love that manuscript, deep flaws and all!

 

 

Amy: From reading your blog, I know you have a great circle of critique partners. How do they affect your writing process?

 

Dahlia: The wonderfulness of my critique partners cannot be overstated. They’re amazing about letting me talk things out and use them as a sounding board, and just at giving critique in general. They make my books better, period, and their wide variety of knowledge is super helpful, especially when it comes to those “normal” things I didn’t experience, like what high school football games are actually supposed to look like!

 

 

Amy: Did your query for BEHIND THE SCENES come easily or did it go through many drafts?

 

Dahlia: My query for BEHIND THE SCENES came incredibly easy to me, which has never, ever been the case for me with any other query letter. I wrote it before I wrote the actual book. After realizing how much trouble I was having with my previous manuscript being so character driven, I really wanted to write something with a strong, linear plot driving the manuscript forward, and BTS was my brain’s response to that desire. I wrote a really early draft on Evernote on my phone, long before I ever planned to start writing the manuscript itself, and then one night I was struck by the entire text of it while lying in bed. I got up, took my husband’s iPad, wrote it in an e-mail to myself, and went back to bed. Voila. It changed slightly during The Writer’s Voice contest thanks to critique from my team, but very, very slightly.

 

 

Amy: How many agents did you query for BEHIND THE SCENES? Did you receive immediate responses or did you have to wait a while for replies?

 

Dahlia: I actually only queried five agents for BEHIND THE SCENES, because its first entry into the world was in The Writer’s Voice contest, and that’s where my agent found it and requested on it, so it had an offer in its first two weeks. I got form rejections from two agents really, really quickly, and then two of the other three – plus one who had a full of my previous ms, and one who’d also requested from The Writer’s Voice – responded to my “I have an offer” nudge within the week, so all in all it was a very fast process.

 

Amy: Was there ever a time you thought about giving up on your writing dream? If so, what motivated you to keep writing?

 

Dahlia: I’ve always, always loved writing, and to me, the act of writing and the dream of getting published are very separate things. Are there times I think I’ll never sell? Yes, definitely. But selling isn’t why I write, so not selling will never be why I don’t!

 

 

 

Behindthescenes

 

 

 

High school senior Ally Duncan’s best friend may be the Vanessa Park – star of TV’s hottest new teen drama – but Ally’s not interested in following in her BFF’s Hollywood footsteps. In fact, the only thing Ally’s ever really wanted is to go to Columbia and study abroad in Paris. But when her father’s mounting medical bills threaten to stop her dream in its tracks, Ally nabs a position as Van’s on-set assistant to get the cash she needs.

 

Spending the extra time with Van turns out to be fun, and getting to know her sexy co-star Liam is an added bonus. But when the actors’ publicist arranges for Van and Liam to “date” for the tabloids just after he and Ally share their first kiss, Ally will have to decide exactly what role she’s capable of playing in their world of make believe. If she can’t play by Hollywood’s rules, she may lose her best friend, her dream future, and her first shot at love.

 

 

BEHIND THE SCENES is now available for purchase at Amazon, Barnes & Noble & Indiebound.

 

 

dahliaDahlia Adler is an Assistant Editor of Mathematics at an academic publisher, Copy Editor, and blogger @BNBuzz and YA Misfits. She is represented by Lana Popovic. You can find her on Twitter as @MissDahlELama and on her blog, The Daily Dahlia. It’s not really daily but it’s definitely her!

 

 

QUERY 101 SERIES: NUDGING ETIQUETTE June 20, 2014

Query 101B

 

The entire query process is about waiting. First you send the query and then you wait. And wait. And wait. If you get a request, you send your material and wait again. It’s all about patience and well, honestly, keeping yourself distracted so you don’t go crazy.

 

But what if you’ve been waiting longer than usual? Now I’m not talking 3-4 weeks. Most agencies quote on their websites they need at least 6-8 weeks to read queries and/or requested materials. Some require more. Make sure you check the agency’s website before sending that nudge.

 

Yet if you’ve been waiting beyond the specified time, there are certain procedures you should follow in order to follow-up with the requesting agent. First, above all, act professional. Send them an email (preferably within the email request chain) and confirm they have received your materials. Then politely inquire as to when you can expect a reply.

 

I’ve been in this situation before and have had success with nudging. In almost every email I sent to an agent, I received a reply within at least a week. So how do you word such an email? I used the following format which came from agent, Bree Ogden in a great post she did for Lit Reactor:

 

 

Dear [Agent],

I’m writing to check on the status of my manuscript [title] sent to you on [date]. I understand you are very busy; I just wanted to make sure it arrived safely in your inbox. Thank you again for your interest in my work. I look forward to hearing from you.

Best,

[Name]

 

 

Simple and to the point. You don’t need to go into great detail about your manuscript, but you do need to be straightforward about what information you are requesting from the agent.

 

Let’s be clear here: this is in regards to requested materials. DO NOT nudge on a query. The only reason you should follow-up on a query is if the agency has a reply policy.  If they state they will respond to ALL received queries, and you haven’t heard back, then it is okay to resend the query. BUT that is only in the case where the agency has SPECIFICALLY stated this policy on their submission page.

 

What if you don’t hear back right away from the nudge? I’d recommend giving the agent at least two weeks to reply. If you don’t hear anything, I’d send one more nudge. After that, unfortunately if it’s radio silence, I would assume the agent is passing.

 

The key here again is to stay professional. Many agents are not only juggling clients and conference obligations, but submissions to editors, as well as reading NUMEROUS manuscripts (not only from you but other aspiring writers). It’s hard to wait, believe me I understand, but publishing is all about waiting and PATIENCE (tons of patience). Hang in there, work on something new and cross your fingers that your email soon “dings” with great news!

 

 

Next up in the QUERY 101 series: A special guest post by agent, Pooja Menon, on handling “The Call.”

 

 

W.O.W. – Writer Odyssey Wednesday with Emery Lord June 18, 2014

WOW

 

 

One of the things I love about today’s W.O.W. with Emery Lord are her comments about taking your time when researching agents. Many times writers discover an agent who reps books in their category and send out a query right away without taking time to consider whether or not that agent would be a good fit for them.  As Emery points out, she “did research and looked for agents who had gaps in their list where she may fit in.” Emery’s success is a perfect example of taking your time and considering who you want to work with. By doing your homework, hopefully your ending will be as extraordinary as hers!

 

Many thanks to Emery for sharing her writing journey today…

 

 

Amy: When did you first begin seriously writing with the intent of wanting to be published?

 

Emery: 2010. I started writing contemporary YA a bit in 2009 but got serious the next year. Publication wasn’t on my mind at first. I just really loved writing. I wanted to hone my craft and finish a whole book. It wasn’t until after I finished a draft and dug into revisions that I started to think I could do something with it.

 

 

Amy: When did you complete your first Young Adult manuscript?

 

Emery: Early 2011

 

 

Amy: I devoured OPEN ROAD SUMMER! I was really struck by, and loved, the song lyrics. Are you a songwriter by trade?

 

Emery: Thank you so much! I’m definitely not a songwriter! I forced myself to try songwriting, a little bit, for Open Road Summer. I play the piano, and I made myself come up with chords and write each song out, so the lyrics would ring true. It was awkward and I laughed at myself a lot, but I felt like it helped inform Matt and Dee as characters and as individual writers themselves.

 

 

Amy: Did you have critique partners or beta readers that helped you polish OPEN ROAD SUMMER?  If so, how critical were they to the process of completing the manuscript?

 

Emery: I have a critique partner (the brilliant Bethany Robison) who works with me on everything I write (and vice versa). She knows my strengths and calls me out if I’m not using them. She also knows my weaknesses and won’t let me get away with them. So, um, very critical? Haha! But none of that ever *feels* critical. Because Bethy is on my team, you know? She’s my pal and the godmother of my characters–and there is a huge level of trust on both sides. She pushes me toward my best work, and I’m a better writer because of it.

 

 

Amy: How laborious/frustrating was the query process for you?

 

Emery: Truthfully, the query process *after* clicking send was quick and straightforward. But I researched for months beforehand while revising, and that was definitely laborious.

 

 

Amy: As many writers know the publishing world is very hard to break into. What was the one thing you did to help garner agent attention?

 

Emery: I guess just knowing my audience? Any time I needed a break from revising my ms, I’d pop over to and read about various agents…their tastes, what they rep, current client lists, etc. I was particularly looking for gaps between what they said they were interested in and what their clients were writing. (They said they love contemporary YA but apparently only have 1 client writing it/seems quite different than my style, that suggested maybe they had room for my ms on their list? That kind of thing.)

 

 

Amy: What was your call like with your agent, Taylor Martindale?  How did you know she was the right fit for you?

 

Emery: Many reasons but the one that still really sealed it: contemporary YA was NOT doing well in early 2011, and I knew it. (We were coming down from paranormal; dystopian was booming.) Taylor knew it too. But she wanted my book anyway–not because it would be an easy sell for her but because she wanted that story on shelves for readers. In that first conversation, she just had such passion in her voice, insisting that contemporary YA with quiet character moments belonged in the market and that she wanted to advocate for books like that, books like mine. I just sat there, listening, thinking: holy crap, she has this fire…she’s going to fight like heck for this story. And she did! She’s a champion for character-driven novels, diversity and positivity–exactly as I knew her to be in that first call.

 

 

Amy: If you were giving a keynote speech at a writer’s conference, what would be the most important piece of advice you would share?

 

Emery: Write at the intersection of an interesting story and what matters to your very soul. Yes, writing to entertain is important. But writing something entertaining that has your passion surrounding it like a force field? That’s everything. That’s your trademark, your fingerprints on this planet pressed into the book pages. What matters to you will keep you at your desk late at night. It’ll keep you typing even when reviews burn or don’t even make sense. When what is feeding your story is something greater than YOU, it gives you fight. So write around what you BELIEVE in or the questions you wrestle with or the parts that hurt–but make sure it matters to you in the deepest vessel of your heart, so much it almost hurts sometimes.

 

 

 

 

Open Road

 

 

 

After breaking up with her bad-news boyfriend, Reagan O’Neill is ready to leave her rebellious ways behind. . . and her best friend, country superstar Lilah Montgomery, is nursing a broken heart of her own. Fortunately, Lilah’s 24-city tour is about to kick off, offering a perfect opportunity for a girls-only summer of break-up ballads and healing hearts. But when Matt Finch joins the tour as its opening act, his boy-next-door charm proves difficult for Reagan to resist, despite her vow to live a drama-free existence. This summer, Reagan and Lilah will navigate the ups and downs of fame and friendship as they come to see that giving your heart to the right person is always a risk worth taking.

 

 

 

emerylord
Emery Lord lives in Ohio with a husband, two rescue dogs and a closet full of impractical shoes. Open Road Summer is her first novel.

 


 

First Five Frenzy with Carrie Howland of Donadio & Olson, Inc. June 13, 2014

FFF SideWords

 

 

If you’re like me, you toil for hours editing and fine-tuning the first pages of your manuscript. You look at the first lines to make sure they are compelling and tight. You examine the next few paragraphs, hoping your MC’s voice is already taking hold of the reader.

 

The First Five Frenzy is all about getting an agent’s perspective on what works, and what fails, in those first pages of a manuscript. By reading each agent’s comments, I hope you’ll learn how to make your manuscript a shining gem that will be requested time and time again.

 

Today, I am proud to share Literary Agent, Carrie Howland’s perspective on what’s important in those critical first pages.

 

 

Amy: Many writers have the impression that a great first line is imperative to drawing in the reader. How important is a first line to you as an agent?

 

Carrie: A first line, like any first impression, is always important. It shows that you, as a writer, are coming out swinging. The problem comes when you focus so much on the first line, that you forget about the rest of the page, chapter, book. I don’t think a writer should ever focus so much on any one thing that he or she forgets about the work as a whole. A great first line draws the reader in, but great second, third, and forth lines are what keep them reading.

 

 

Amy: Many times a writer is told to stay away from common openings like dreams, eating breakfast, riding in a car, etc. What are some common openings you recommend writers stay away from?

 

Carrie: I don’t like to say that there is any one thing to stay away from, because done right, even something as common or mundane as eating breakfast can be really powerful. I think, instead, it’s important to focus on why you’re including that scene and how you’re writing it. Does eating breakfast best serve your manuscript? Is the scene really working, both style and plot-wise? If yes, then keep going. Make sure you’re writing the most original breakfast-eating scene imaginable. If, instead, you’re using the breakfast scene as a crutch, because you’ve seen it done before, or because it’s easy, then it’s not best serving the manuscript and you, as the writer, need to push yourself beyond your comfort zone, beyond the breakfast table, to write something truly original.

 

 

Amy: When you’ve responded to a writer to request a partial or full manuscript, what was it about their first pages that piqued your interest?

 

Carrie: A strong voice and great writing. My background is in poetry, so there’s nothing I love more than a beautiful, well-written line. Those are the first things I notice. They show themselves before plot or character development. Before concept, really. Good writing is what takes me to the next page and then the next. It’s what compels me to ask for the full manuscript. That said, I do love a good, high-concept idea. While my taste tends to skew literary, I still love a good story. And if your work is high-concept and well-written, expect a request for more!

 

 

Amy: What are some common mistakes writers make in their first five pages?

 

Carrie: Not staying true to your own voice and work. I often read things that feel derivative. Perhaps someone has read too many books like theirs that have influenced them. Perhaps they’re trying so hard to write in one genre, that they’re not allowing the work to breathe and expand, to be what it could and should be. I think it’s important to let your work evolve as you write, to go with the direction the words take you. If you start out intending to write adult literary fiction, but find you’re writing a beautiful young adult story, go with it. Don’t pigeonhole yourself. I also caution against allowing too many people to read your work, and revising based on all their ideas. It becomes too much. I can always tell early on when a writer has had input from ten other people, because the seams show. The manuscript becomes a Frankenstein’s Monster version of itself. Again, stay true to your work. Taking advice from too many different people will cause your manuscript to become a bit of a mess, and it will be obvious to anyone reading it that it’s been overworked. Not only is this a problem for the manuscript itself, but it makes me question the writer’s faith in his or her own talents. Believe in yourself as a writer, and it will show in your work.

 

 

Amy: What resonates with you most in those first pages? Voice? Pacing? Unique concept?

 

Carrie: Voice has always been of the utmost importance to me. It’s the thing I look for in any manuscript, across any genre. If your voice is strong, unique, quirky, I’m interested. That voice will sustain me throughout the manuscript. It’s also something I can’t teach or fix. A manuscript either has it, or it doesn’t. Whereas things like plot issues and pacing problems can be edited, a strong voice needs to come from the writer and needs to be present from the beginning. I’ve taken on several projects with plot issues, because the voice was so strong, I couldn’t turn away from the project. Those voices stay with me long after I put the pages down.

 

 

Carrie Howland is a literary agent at Donadio & Olson, Inc., where she represents literary fiction, narrative non-fiction, young adult, and middle grade authors. In addition to her own clients, she handles foreign, first serial, and audio rights for the agency. Carrie is a member of the Association of Authors’ Representatives and writes for its newsletter. She also enjoys speaking at various writing conferences throughout the year. Carrie holds a B.A. in English and Creative Writing from Albion College, where she was the Poetry Editor of The Albion Review. Her poetry has appeared in various literary journals and magazines. In her spare time, Carrie volunteers as a foster for a local dog rescue. She lives in Brooklyn, New York. You can follow her on twitter at @ecarriehowland or learn more about Donadio & Olson at www.donadio.com.

 

If you’re interested in submitting to Carrie, please make sure to check the Donadio & Olson website for their guidelines.

 

 

 

 

 

Query 101 Series: Handling Requests & Manuscript Formatting June 6, 2014

Query 101B

 

 

Being in the query trenches can sometimes be a long and tedious process. You write those letters, press “send” and then wait, jumping every time your email alert goes off. Yes, in this case patience can be a virtue (albeit a painful one). But then that day comes, you see, or hear, you have something in your inbox and there it is: A REQUEST!! Give yourself a minute to revel in it – enjoy it! After that, it’s time to focus on your next steps.

 

In most cases, the requesting agent will give you specific directions on how to submit. I can’t stress this enough – FOLLOW DIRECTIONS. If they ask you to make your query the first page, DO IT! If they ask for the first 50 pages, be honest and send 50 pages (not 75 or 100). Most agents say it’s okay to go over a little to get to the end of a scene or  chapter, but don’t push the limit.

 

 

Sending your request:

 

 

- Be sure your manuscript is formatted correctly (see details below)

 

- Send as soon as possible. If the agent is requesting your manuscript, it’s still fresh in his/her mind. You want to capitalize on this!

 

- Reply within the email chain. This way the agent has a frame of reference for your work. If it’s a request from a contest or conference, make sure you write in the subject line: REQUESTED MATERIALS (with some reference point i.e. from XX contest or XX conference).

 

 

 

Now with requests several issues may come up:

 

 

 

1) You’re in the middle of more revisions, or you’ve gotten specific feedback from a contest or agent that you’d like to make.

 

Many agent interviews I’ve read recommend making the changes and then sending. It’s okay to send a short note to the agent acknowledging their request and letting them know you are making changes.

 

 

2) You already have an offer.

 

Let the agent know right away. Give them a chance to either bow out or offer to read within an allotted time (some recommend one to two weeks based on the conversation you’ve already had with offering agent).

 

 

 

If this is the first time you’ve gotten a request, again be sure to follow the directions dictated by the agent. They may have specific ways they want you to format your manuscript. If they don’t, and you have questions about how to indicate scene breaks, or what font to use, I recommend using the outline below from The Editor’s Blog:

 

 

  • Twelve point, Times New Roman (or Courier New, if you insist), black font

 

  • One-inch margins on all four sides

 

  • Half-inch paragraph indentations (five spaces) (this tab is pre-set in MS Word) for the first line of each paragraph

 

  • Double space; no extra spaces between paragraphs

 

  • Align left (not justified). The right edges will not be uniform or even

 

  • Number pages beginning with the actual story (don’t count or put page numbers on the title page)

 

  • Indicate scene breaks by inserting a blank line and centering the number sign # in the center of the line

 

  • Include your last name, your title (or keywords from the title), and the page number in the page header of every page except for the title page. Align the header to the right, so the information doesn’t interfere with the text of the manuscript. (Jones/Taming the Monster/1)

 

  • Begin chapters on new pages (insert a page break). Center the chapter title, even if it’s only Chapter One (or Chapter 1), about 1/3 of the way down the page. Skip a couple of spaces and begin the text of the chapter.

 

  • Center a number sign # one double-spaced blank line down at the end of the manuscript. Or simply write The End. You want agents and editors to know they’ve reached the end.

 

  • Use italics for italicized words. (Former practice was to underline to show italicized words, but that’s no longer necessary unless an agent or publisher requests underlining.)

 

  • Single space rather than two spaces after periods between sentences. If you forget this one, nobody’s going to turn down your manuscript because of it. It’s just a good habit to get into, especially for those of us who learned on typewriters and always added two spaces between sentences.

 

 

Include a title page

 

 

  • Aligned left and single spaced, near the top of the page, include contact information: Your real/legal name, address, phone number, e-mail address. Follow with the word count. Alternatively, you can set word count apart by listing it at the top of the right side of the title page.

 

  • About 1/2 the way down the page, centered, enter the full manuscript title (all caps or mixed caps); on the next double-spaced line, type by or a novel by or a story by; on the next double-spaced line, add your pen name or your real name plus your pen name—Alexis Chesterfield writing as Billie Thomas.

 

  • Header information is not included on the title page. The title page is not included in page numbering.

 

 

Again, it is very important to make sure you follow specific formatting guidelines for two reasons:

 

First, you want to present yourself as being professional. A manuscript that is not formatted correctly can look sloppy, plus it shows you haven’t done your research.

 

Second, there are specific reasons the agent may have gone out of their way to give you directions. Perhaps they want to read your manuscript on an e-reader, and only by following their directive can they do this.

 

Overall, remember to celebrate this victory. You’ve worked tirelessly to write a great manuscript and an equally compelling query. A request is a great accomplishment, and you need to approach it with the same focus you would any other major project in your life.

 

 

 

W.O.W. – Writer Odyssey Wednesday with Becky Wallace June 4, 2014

WOW

 

 

For some writers I think there’s a belief that when you sign with an agent you’ve finally made it. Sure, there is still work involved, but once you polish your manuscript it’s going to hit editors desks and sell right away. As today’s W.O.W. with Becky Wallace illustrates, that is not always the case. Sometimes it may take several manuscripts before the right one makes a splash with editors, and as a writer you need to be prepared for that reality. I’m grateful to Becky for sharing this part of her writing journey. It serves as another reminder that publishing can be a rough business, but if you believe in your work, and hold tight to your dreams, you can be a success!

 

Many thanks to Becky for sharing her writing journey today…

 

 

Amy: When did you complete your first Young Adult manuscript?

 

Becky: Oh…I don’t know.  Like a thousand, or maybe three-ish, years ago.  My first ms was a Nanowrimo success story (though I wasn’t a winner, per se).  I started it in August. Finished in December, and edited through February.

 

 

Amy: Did you have critique partners or beta readers that helped you polish THE STORYSPINNER?  If so, how critical were they to the process of completing the manuscript?

 

Becky: I do have a handful of critique partners who looked at THE STORYSPINNER at a variety of stages.  I have one alpha-reader–someone who reads every chapter as I write them–and provides feedback as the story develops. I have one CP who reads my mss when they’ve reached the mid-point.  She helps me make sure the story is on track, that my characters are growing, and that the pace is good.  Then I have two or three other people who read my ms when it’s finished.  They give me overall feedback for the book, point out plot holes, and areas where the writing can be tightened. They are all critical to the development of the story.

 

 

Amy: How laborious/frustrating was the query process for you?

 

Becky: I felt very lucky with my querying process.  I queried nearly fifty agents, but had a lot of positive response right away.  I ended up with multiple offers to chose from. My frustration came later (see the next question).

 

 

Amy: How many agents did you query for THE STORYSPINNER?

 

Becky: So…remember that frustration I mentioned in the previous question?  THE STORYSPINNER was my fourth manuscript after I got my agent.  That’s right, ladies and gents, I shelved three manuscripts (one paranormal and two contemporary thrillers) before I started writing fantasy.  If you think querying is hell, can I just say that knowing your book is on an editor’s desk, sitting, gathering dust, waiting to be accepted or rejected, is a gazillion times worse?  It’s worse than hot pokers and brimstone.  Being on sub is like standing in a pool of water with your hair continuously on fire and an unquenchable thirst. And I went through it. Four times.

 

 

Amy: Did you receive instantaneous response or did you have to wait for the requests/rejections?

 

Becky: For my query I did receive an immediate response. Start to finish (from first email to contract), the process was less than a month. Submission, as I said before, was a much more painful process. Sometimes it was six months before I got a response and sometimes no response ever came.

 

 

Amy: What was your call like with your agent, Jennifer Laughran?  How did you know she was the right fit for you?

 

Becky: I was a basket case when Jenn called, pacing around my house and sweating profusely.  I’m so grateful no one could see me because it would be the epitome of all things embarrassing. Yet Jenn was so, so nice.  She has such a dynamic personality.  She’s funny and upbeat and honest.  I love those things about her!

 

 

Amy: If you were speaking at a conference and an aspiring writer told you they were thinking about giving up on their publishing dream, what would you say to them?

 

Becky: I would say, “I’ve been there.” When no one picked up my third manuscript and I knew my fourth would be going out soon, I said to one of my critique partners, “If this one doesn’t sell, then I’m giving up.  It’s not fair to myself and my family to put so much time and effort into writing, if it’s just going to be a time and energy void.”  But I pushed through and edited the heck out of THE STORYSPINNER. If I was going to give up, I needed to know that I gave writing my best effort before I walked away.  And that’s the best advice I can give to anyone, at any stage in publishing cycle. Don’t quit until you know, for sure, that you can walk away without any regrets. 

 

 

 

StorySpinner

 

 

In a world where dukes plot their way to the throne, a Performer’s life can get tricky.

 

All Johanna Von Arlo wants to do is become a Storyspinner. But her options are so limited that she is forced to work for the aggravating and handsome Lord Rafael DeSilva. While in his employ, Johanna is exposed to a dangerous game of thrones, a game where she will discover that the magically inclined Keepers from her stories might be real after all.

 

The Keepers are searching for an heir to a great power and the key to saving their land. They aren’t alone in their hunt. Girls matching the heir’s description are turning up dead all over the kingdom. Girls who look exactly like Johanna.

 

 

View More: http://ampersandphoto.pass.us/becky-headshotsIn second grade, Becky Wallace had to sit in the corner because she refused to write anything except princess stories and fairy tales (and because she talked too much). Her time in isolation gave her plenty of opportunities to dream up the fantasy worlds she’s been dabbling with ever since. She was lucky enough to find her own real-life Prince Charming. They have four munchkins and live in happy little town near Houston, Texas. For more on Becky, check out her website or follow her on Twitter, Facebook or Pinterest.

 

 

 
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